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Poster

Planning a route with multiple targets in a regionalised environment

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84883

Wiener,  JM
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84072

Mallot,  HA
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Wiener, J., & Mallot, H. (2002). Planning a route with multiple targets in a regionalised environment. Poster presented at 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, Glasgow, UK.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DF64-0
Zusammenfassung
Hierarchical encoding of space influences distance estimations, directional judgements, spatial priming and recall of landmarks. Yet little is known about the impact of regionalized (hierarchical) spatial memory on route planning and navigation. By employing navigation tasks with multiple targets we studied the influence of regions as well as spatially clustered targets on route planning. Subjects navigated through a virtual environment composed of 16 places arranged on a regular 4 by 4 grid. Places were grouped into 4 square islands. All places could be identified by associated objects. The Places were connected in a city-block topology by streets or bridges. Subsequent to exploration and t raining, subjects were asked to navigate the shortest route connecting three of the places (targets) within the environment. When two of the targets were neighbouring each other (spatial cluster), while the third target was sole, subjects preferred routes that first passed the cluster. When two of the targets not only formed a spatial cluster but were also located on the same island (regional cluster) the preference strongly increased. This region effect provides additional evidence for hierarchical theories of spatial representations. We also discuss the contribution of region boundaries and target clusters to route planning.