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Poster

Facial motion and the perception of facial attractiveness

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84018

Knappmeyer,  B
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84258

Thornton,  IM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Knappmeyer, B., Thornton, I., Etcoff, N., & Bülthoff, H. (2002). Facial motion and the perception of facial attractiveness. Poster presented at Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2002), Sarasota, FL, USA.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DE87-A
Zusammenfassung
Facial attractiveness has been extensively studied within many disciplines, such as art, anthropology and sociology. Within psychology it has usually been explored via static line drawings, photographs or computer generated pictures of faces. The faces that we see in everyday life, however, are continuously moving as we talk or laugh, for instance. Thus faces are dynamic rather than static objects varying along both spatial and temporal dimensions. While it has been well established that facial motion conveys information about gender, age, emotion and even identity, it is not clear whether it also contributes to the perception of facial attractiveness. Previously we made use of computer animation and motion capture techniques to investigate the relative contribution of facial form and facial motion to the perception of identity.Here, we use the same method to explore whether facial motion contributes to the perception of facialattractiveness. For this purpose we captured complex facial motion patterns from different human actors and applied them to an average face. Preliminary data suggests that facial motion, in the absence of individual facial form cues, can be used as a basis for attractiveness judgements. We are currently investigating the relative contribution of both cues, facial form and facial motion, to the overall impression of facial attractiveness.