de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Buchkapitel

Object recognition, neurophysiology

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84297

Wallis,  GM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Wallis, G., & Bülthoff, H. (2002). Object recognition, neurophysiology. In The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks (pp. 792-796). Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DE60-F
Zusammenfassung
As viewing distance, viewing angle or lighting conditions change, so too does the image of an object which we see. Despite the seemingly endless variety of images that objects can project, the human visual system remains able to rapidly and reliably identify them across huge changes in appearance. Understanding how humans achieve this feat of recognition has long been a source of debate. Despite a concerted e ort, researchers are still undecided even about the most fundamental questions of how objects are represented in cortex. This chapter gives a brief overview of some theoretical approaches in the context of mainly neurophysiological evidence. It also considers the related question of objects within a physical context, that is the analysis of visual scenes. Scene analysis is relevant to the question of object recognition because scenes are initially recognised at a holistic, object-like level, providing a context or `gist' which itself in uences the speed and accuracy of recognition of the constituent objects (Rensink, 2000). A precise characterisation of gist remains elusive, but it may well include information such as global color patterns, spatial frequency content, correlational structure, anything which is useful for categorising or recognising the scene.