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Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation: a technique for studying the properties of neuronal networks

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84260

Tolias,  AS
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84023

Kourtzi,  Z
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Tolias, A., Kourtzi, Z., & Logothetis, N. (2002). Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation: a technique for studying the properties of neuronal networks. In Exploratory analysis and data modeling in functional neuroimaging (pp. 109-125). Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DE34-2
Abstract
Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be used to study the networks of neurons that underline different behaviors. The blood oxygenation level-dependent signal though, measures the activity averaged across heterogeneous population of neurons with different response characteristics. It is therefore often impossible to infer the properties of the underlying imaged neural populations by simply examining the fMRI signal. Here, we describe the use of an adaptation paradigm to study the properties of neuronal populations beyond the spatial resolution of fMRI.