de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Attentional enhancement opposite a peripheral flash revealed using change blindness

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84264

Tse,  PU
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84493

Sheinberg,  DL
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Tse, P., Sheinberg, D., & Logothetis, N. (2003). Attentional enhancement opposite a peripheral flash revealed using change blindness. Psychological Science, 14(2), 91-99. doi:10.1111/1467-9280.t01-1-01425.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DCD3-A
Abstract
We describe a new method for mapping spatial attention that reveals a pooling of attention in the hemifield opposite a peripheral flash. Our method exploits the fact that a brief full-field blank can interfere with the detection of changes in a scene that occur during the blank. Attending to the location of a change, however, can overcome this change blindness, so that changes are detected. The likelihood of detecting a new element in a scene therefore provides a measure of the occurrence of attention at that element's location. Using this measure, we mapped how attention changes in response to a task-irrelevant peripheral cue. Under conditions of visual fixation, change detection was above chance across the entire visual area tested. In addition, a "hot spot" of attention (corresponding to near-perfect change detection) elongated along the cue-fixation axis, such that performance improved not only at the cued location but also in the opposite hemifield.