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Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: Obstacle-avoidance is not the explanation.

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84990

Franz,  VH
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Franz, V., Bülthoff, H., & Fahle, M. (2003). Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: Obstacle-avoidance is not the explanation. Experimental Brain Research, 149(4), 470-477. doi:10.1007/s00221-002-1364-6.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DCA7-E
Abstract
The perception-versus-action hypothesis states that visual information is processed in two different streams, one for visual awareness (or perception) and one for motor performance. Previous reports that the Ebbinghaus illusion deceives perception but not grasping seemed to indicate that this dichotomy between perception and action was fundamental enough to be reflected in the overt behavior of non-neurological, healthy humans. Contrary to this view we show that the Ebbinghaus illusion affects grasping to the same extent as perception. We also show that the grasp effects cannot be accounted for by non-perceptual obstacle avoidance mechanisms as has recently been suggested. Instead, even subtle variations of the Ebbinghaus illusion affect grasping in the same way as they affect perception. Our results suggest that the same signals are responsible for the perceptual effects and for the motor effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion. This casts doubt on one line of evidence, which used to strongly favor the perception-versus-action hypothesis.