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Poster

Determining the cortical stimulation site in TMS: Linking physiological measurements with physical field models

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84257

Thielscher,  A
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84000

Kammer,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Former Department Comparative Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Thielscher, A., & Kammer, T. (2003). Determining the cortical stimulation site in TMS: Linking physiological measurements with physical field models. Poster presented at 29th Göttingen Neurobiology Conference, Göttingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DC5D-3
Zusammenfassung
We report a novel method to determine the site and size of stimulated cortical area in TMS. Applied to the motor cortex, it allows to determine the likely cortical representation of muscles. Up to now, the most common procedure for this is motor mapping. In motor mapping, the obtained two-dimensional distribution of coil positions with associated muscle responses is used to calculate a center of gravity on the skull. However, classical mapping does not allow to determine the exact stimulation site on the cortex and only rough estimates of its size are possible. Our method combines physiological measurements with a physical model used to predict the electric field induced by the TMScoi l to overcome these limitations. In four subjects motor responses in a small hand muscle were mapped with 9 - 13 stimulation sites at the head perpendicular to the central sulcus in order to keep the induced current direction constant in a given cortical region of interest. Input-output functions from these head locations were used to determine stimulator intensities that elicit half-maximal muscle responses. Based on these stimulator intensities the field distribution on the individual cortical surface was calculated as rendered from anatomical MR data. The region on the cortical surface in which the different stimulation sites produced the same electric field strength (minimal variance 4.2 ± 0.8 . ) was determined as the most likely stimulation site on the cortex. In all subjects, it was located at the lateral part of the hand knob in the motor cortex. Comparisons of model calculations with the solutions obtained in this manner reveal that the stimulated cortex area innervating the target muscle is substantially smaller than the size of the electric field induced by the coil.