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Journal Article

Generalized Flash Suppression of Salient Visual Targets

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84868

Wilke,  M
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84050

Leopold,  DA
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wilke, M., Logothetis, N., & Leopold, D. (2003). Generalized Flash Suppression of Salient Visual Targets. Neuron, 39(6), 1043-1052. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2003.08.003.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DBA1-F
Abstract
A pattern of light striking the retina of an alert observer is normally readily perceived. While a handful of conditions exist in which even salientvisual stimuli can be rendered invisible, the mechanisms underlying such suppression remain poorly understood. Here, we describe experiments using a novel stimulation sequence that gives rise to the sudden and reliable subjective disappearance of a wide range of visual patterns. We found that a parafoveal target immediately vanished from perception following the abrupt onset of a surrounding texture. The probability of disappearance was influenced by the ocular configuration of the target and surround, as well as their spatial separation. In addition, suppression was critically dependent upon several hundred milliseconds of stimulus-specific adaptation. These findings demonstrate that the all-or-none disappearance of a salientvisualtarget, which is reminiscent of a high-level selection process, is inextricably linked to topographic stimulus representations, presumably in the early visual cortex.