de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Conference Paper

Drivers steer in their direction of gaze

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84159

Readinger,  WO
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83857

Chatziastros,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83870

Cunningham,  DW
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Readinger, W., Chatziastros, A., Cunningham, D., Cutting, J., & Bülthoff, H. (2004). Drivers steer in their direction of gaze. Vision in Vehicles IX, Aug. 2001, Brisbane, Australia, -.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-F3A5-9
Abstract
Instructions given to novices learning certain tasks of applied navigation often suggest that gazedirection (?line of sight?) should preview the path the operator desires to take (e.g., Bondurant Blakemore, 1998; Motorcycle Safety Foundation, 1992; Morris, 1990), presumably because looking behavior can ultimately affect steering control through hand, arm, or leg movements that could lead to undesired path deviations. Here, we control participants? gaze-direction while driving an automobile in virtual reality, and find that gaze-eccentricity has a large, systematic effect on steering and lane-position. Moreover, even when head-position and postural effects of the driver are controlled, there remains a significant bias to drive in the direction of fixation, indicating the existence of a perceptual, and not merely motor, phenomenon.