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Role of Featural and Congural Information in Recognition Across Different Viewpoints

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84420

Schwaninger,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schumacher, S., Schwaninger, A., Wallraven, C., & Bülthoff, H. (2004). Role of Featural and Congural Information in Recognition Across Different Viewpoints. Poster presented at 7th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2004), Tübingen, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DA07-6
Abstract
Everyday life requires us to identify different faces in many different poses and views, despite this complexity, we are capable of recognizing familiar faces reasonably well. In this study, we focus on the question of what kind of information human observers use to recognize faces across variations in viewpoint; specically, whether they use only holistic information, or whether they encode and store the local information contained in facial parts (featural information) as well as their spatial relationships (congural information). Three experiments were conducted, modelled after the inter-extra-ortho experiments by B¨ulthoff Edelman, 1992, who used novel objects as stimuli (wire- and amoebae-like 3D objects). Experiment 1 was designed as a base line for the subsequent experiments. Ten face-stimuli were presented in frontal view and 45 r side view. At test they had to be recognized among ten distractor faces at different viewpoints. We found systematic effects of viewpoint (recognition performance: inter = extra s ortho) similar to results in the original study. Experiments 2 and 3 were designed analogously to Experiment 1 except for the fact that in the testing phase the faces were presented scrambled or blurred. The results showed that human observers are capable of recognizing faces across different viewpoints on the sole basis of isolated featural information and of isolated congural information. Furthermore, we found systematic effects of viewpoint for both isolated congural information and isolated featural information. The results provide further support for two routes in face recognition and clearly show that part-based processing is at least as viewpoint dependent as congural information. This effectively demonstrates how view-based recognition pertains even to different processing routes. In addition to the psychophysical experiments, systematic differences between the effects of viewpoint are discussed in a computational framework based on key frames.