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Poster

Local Processing in Spatiotemporal Boundary Formation

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83865

Cooke,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83870

Cunningham,  DW
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Cooke, T., Cunningham, D., & Wallraven, C. (2004). Local Processing in Spatiotemporal Boundary Formation. Poster presented at 7th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2004), Tübingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D9F9-E
Zusammenfassung
Patterns of abrupt changes in a scene, such as the dynamic occlusion of texture elements (causing their apppearance and disappearance), can give rise to the perception of the edges of the occluder via a process called Spatiotemporal Boundary Formation (SBF). It has previously been shown that SBF can be disrupted by very small amounts of dynamic noise spread globally throughout a scene. We recently developed a mathematical model of SBF in which groups of local changes are used to extract edges, which are then combined into a gure and used to estimate the gure's motion. The model implies that SBF relies on local processing and predicts that SBF should be impaired when noise is added near the edges of the gure, but not when it is added far from the edges. This prediction was tested in a shape-identication task in which the location of noise is varied. Indeed, performance was not impaired by noise far from the gure, but was markedly disrupted by noise near the gure, supporting the notion that changes are integrated locally rather than globally during SBF. In the second part of this project, the mathematical model of SBF was implemented in software. Reichardt-based motion detectors were used to lter the experimental stimuli and provide the input to the software implementation. Three simple geometrical gures, similar to those used in the psychophysical experiment, were reconstructed using this method, demonstrating one way in which a mid-level visual mechanism such as SBF could connect low-level mechanisms such as change detection to higher-level mechanisms such as shape detection.