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Poster

Influence of Occlusion on the Responses of Area TE Neurons in the Macaque Monkey

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84110

Nielsen,  K
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84154

Rainer,  G
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Nielsen, K., Logothetis, N., & Rainer, G. (2004). Influence of Occlusion on the Responses of Area TE Neurons in the Macaque Monkey. Poster presented at 7th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2004), Tübingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D9F5-5
Zusammenfassung
Identifying an image presented behind an occluder is in many cases easily possible. However, under certain occlusion conditions, identication fails. Critically, identication performance depends on which image parts are visible through the occluder. Area TE in the macaque visual cortex is thought to play an important role in object recognition processes. Here, we systematically test how the occlusion of different image regions affected the responses of area TE neurons. Two monkeys (Macaca mulatta) learned to identify members of sets of natural images. We then used Bubbles to assess how the occlusion of different image regions inuenced an observers' performance in the identication task. Most importantly, we determined which image regions had to be visible to allow the observer to identify the image correctly (the “informative” image regions). In most cases, the visibility of a limited portion of the image consistently inuenced the monkeys' performance. Based on these results, we constructed observer-specic image versions that contained informative or uninformative regions only. Recording from neurons in area TE, we compared the responses evoked by the full images to the ones evoked by the image's informative or uninformative parts. Preliminary results suggest that informative regions had a greater inuence on the response and selectivity of TE neurons than non-informative regions. Thus, monkey observers tend to rely on restricted regions of complex natural scenes during identication tasks, and this has an impact on their representation in the inferior temporal cortex