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Poster

Differential effects of synchronous and asynchronous tactile costimulation on somatosensory cortical organisation and tactile discrimination performance

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84141

Pilz,  K
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Pilz, K., Veit, R., & Godde, B. (2004). Differential effects of synchronous and asynchronous tactile costimulation on somatosensory cortical organisation and tactile discrimination performance. Poster presented at 7th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2004), Tübingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D9E1-F
Zusammenfassung
The mammalian neocortex has an amazing capacity for plastic remodelling. This is the basis for lifelong adaptation to alterations in sensory environments and behavioural demands. Hebbian mechanisms seem to play a key role in use- and input-dependent cortical plasticity. We used functional MRI together with a spatial discrimination task to investigate in detail the effects of synchronous and asynchronous tactile coactivation on cortical organisation in the human primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and its behavioural consequences. Coactivation, which is the Hebbian-like associative pairing of tactile stimulation, was applied for three hours to the distal phalanges of index, middle and ring ngers of the right hand either synchronously or asynchronously. Strengthening previous ndings we show here that somatosensory cortical representations in SI for synchronously coactivated ngers move closer together resulting in an integration of those representations. On the other hand, cortical representations for asynchronously coactivated ngers become segregated and move further apart. This coincides with a reduced number of mislocalisations between ngers that have been coactivated asynchronously and an increased number of mislocalisations between ngers that have been coactivated synchronously. These results were reversible within one week after stimulation. Thus, not only synchronous but also asynchronous coupling of passive tactile stimulation is able to induce short-term cortical reorganisation that is associated with functionally relevant changes in the perceptual and behavioural capacities of an individual without active training or attention directed to the stimuli.