de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

Effects of training on neuronal activity and interactions in primary and higher visual cortices in the alert cat

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84006

Kayser,  C
Research Group Physiology of Sensory Integration, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Salazar, R., Kayser, C., & König, P. (2004). Effects of training on neuronal activity and interactions in primary and higher visual cortices in the alert cat. Journal of Neuroscience, 24(7), 1627-1636. doi:10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.3200-03.2004.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D9C9-7
Zusammenfassung
The effects of behavioral training on early visual representations have been elusive when assessed with firing rates. Learning-induced changes in performance, however, suggest that representations should encompass early cortical stages. Here, we address the question of whether training-induced effects are pertinent to neuronal activity outside the task proper, which is a requirement if subsequent perceptional processes should profit from training. To search for a neuronal signature of training effects beyond firing rates, we measured local field potentials, multiunit and isolated spike activity during passive viewing of previously learned stimulus response associations (S+ and S-) in areas 17/18 and 21a of two alert cats. Evoked potential responses as well as gamma oscillations even during the first 200 msec were found to be stronger for S+ in both areas. Most importantly, the later parts of the response (>200 msec) not only exhibit a highly significant difference in coherent gamma oscillations for S+ and S- both within and across areas, but are also characterized by a pronounced preference in firing rate for S+ in area 21a, whereas primary cortex shows a nonsignificant trend for weaker spike responses. From these results, we conclude that training-induced plasticity occurs in adult visual cortex for behaviorally relevant stimuli by changing primarily the temporal structure of neuronal activity at early stages of cortical processing, whereas later stages of cortical processing express the increased coherence of their input in elevated firing rates.