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Conference Paper

Influence of Auditory Cues on the visually-induced Self-Motion Illusion (Circular Vection) in Virtual Reality

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84170

Riecke,  BE
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84199

Schulte-Pelkum,  J
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83846

Caniard,  F
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Riecke, B., Schulte-Pelkum, J., Caniard, F., & Bülthoff, H. (2005). Influence of Auditory Cues on the visually-induced Self-Motion Illusion (Circular Vection) in Virtual Reality. Proceedings of 8th international workshop on Presence 2005, 49-57.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D43B-4
Abstract
This study investigated whether the visually induced selfmotion illusion (“circular vection”) can be enhanced by adding a matching auditory cue (the sound of a fountain that is also visible in the visual stimulus). Twenty observers viewed rotating photorealistic pictures of a market place projected onto a curved projection screen (FOV: 54°x45°). Three conditions were randomized in a repeated measures within-subject design: No sound, mono sound, and spatialized sound using a generic head-related transfer function (HRTF). Adding mono sound increased convincingness ratings marginally, but did not affect any of the other measures of vection or presence. Spatializing the fountain sound, however, improved vection (convincingness and vection buildup time) and presence ratings significantly. Note that facilitation was found even though the visual stimulus was of high quality and realism, and known to be a powerful vection-inducing stimulus. Thus, HRTF-based auralization using headphones can be employed to improve visual VR simulations both in terms of self-motion perception and overall presence.