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High-resolution 1H chemical shift imaging in the monkey visual cortex

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83997

Juchem,  C
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84137

Pfeuffer,  J
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Juchem, C., Logothetis, N., & Pfeuffer, J. (2005). High-resolution 1H chemical shift imaging in the monkey visual cortex. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 54(6), 1541-1546. doi:10.1002/mrm.20687.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D3F5-A
Zusammenfassung
Functionally distinct anatomic subdivisions of the brain can often be only a few millimeters in one or more dimensions. The study of metabolic differences in such structures by means of localized in vivo MR spectroscopy is therefore challenging, if not impossible. In fact, the spatial resolution of chemical shift imaging (CSI) in humans is typically in the range of centimeters. The aim of the present study was to optimize 1 H CSI in monkeys and demonstrate the feasibility of high spatial resolutions up to 1.4 x 2 x 1.4 mm^3. The obtained spatial resolution permitted the segregation of gray and white matter in the visual cortex based on the concentration of different metabolites and neurotransmitters like N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, and creatine. Concentration ratios of white matter versus gray matter tissue as well as between metabolites matched those reported in the literature from healthy human brain, demonstrating the consistency and reliability of the procedure.