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Influence of moderate hypercapnia on neural activity in monkey by simultaneous intracortical recordings and fMRI at 4.7T

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84326

Zappe,  A-CC
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84269

Uludaq,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84154

Rainer,  G
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Zappe, A.-C., Uludaq, K., Rainer, G., & Logothetis, N. (2005). Influence of moderate hypercapnia on neural activity in monkey by simultaneous intracortical recordings and fMRI at 4.7T. Talk presented at 35th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2005). Washington, DC, USA.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D3DB-6
Zusammenfassung
Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by calibrating BOLD using hypercapnia. CO2 administration influences BOLD by increasing and eventually stabilizing blood flow and volume respectively. This leaves blood oxygenation as the predominating (if not the only) factor affecting the magnitude of BOLD. Obviously, the above assortment implies that CO2 increase acts exclusively as vasoactive agent, without affecting neuronal activity and hence oxygen metabolism. Amongst others, the latter assumption was strengthened by the results of Schmidt and Kety in the 50s. Most of the fMRI studies report coupling of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (the ratio of fractional changes in CBF and CMRO2 is n = 2). In this study we investigated the dependence of neural activity on enhanced CO2 concentration by means of simultaneous intracortical recordings and BOLD imaging in the anesthetized macaque monkey.