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Recognising novel deforming objects

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84291

Vuong,  QC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84258

Thornton,  IM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Chuang, L., Vuong, Q., Thornton, I., & Bülthoff, H. (2005). Recognising novel deforming objects. Talk presented at 13th Annual Workshop on Object Perception, Attention, and Memory (OPAM 2005). Toronto, Canada.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D389-B
Abstract
Current theories of visual object recognition tend to focus on static properties, particularly shape. Nonetheless, visual perception is a dynamic experience–as a result of active observers or moving objects. Here, we investigate whether dynamic information can influence visual object-learning. Three learning experiments were conducted that required participants to learn and subsequently recognize different non-rigid objects that deformed over time. Consistent with previous studies of rigid depth-rotation, our results indicate that human observers do represent object-motion. Furthermore, our data suggest that dynamic information could compensate for when static cues are less reliable, for example, as a result of viewpoint variation.