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Poster

Breaking the Stability of Perceptual Instability: Adaptation and Priming in Ambiguous Figure Perception

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83864

Corad,  V
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84023

Kourtzi,  Z
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84307

Welchman,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Corad, V., Kourtzi, Z., & Welchman, A. (2006). Breaking the Stability of Perceptual Instability: Adaptation and Priming in Ambiguous Figure Perception. Poster presented at 9th Tübingen Perception Conference (TWK 2006), Tübingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D28B-F
Zusammenfassung
Ambiguous figure reversal involves a neural mechanism that limits the number of perceptual organizations that can be consciously experienced at a given moment. So how can perceptual experience be stable and continuous in the presence of alternative interpretations of the same physical stimulus? Recent demonstrations using bistable stimuli such as the Necker cube have revealed that repetitive intermittent presentation leads to a stabilization of the percept [1,2]. According to Gepshtein and Kubovy [3] two temporal processes play an important role in the perception of ambiguous figures: adaptation and hysteresis. In the present study we investigated the effects of reference stimulus duration and interstimulus interval length upon transition probability using ambiguous and unambiguous versions of the Mach Card. On the basis of previous research findings we predicted that long preexposure periods to the reference stimulus lead to adaptation effects. Furthermore we hypothesized that the length of the interstimulus interval between reference and test stimulus affects the subsequent perception of the ambiguous test stimulus. As expected, participants displayed a convex bias in their responses to the ambiguous Mach Card reference stimulus—indicating that they perceived the ambiguous Mach Card as a standing book with the spine pointing towards them. The results of the present experiment suggest that prolonged duration times of ambiguous and unambiguous reference stimuli lead to adaptation effects in the perception of the ambiguous test stimulus. Examining the effects of different interstimulus interval lengths, we demonstrated that short reference stimulus duration times in combination with long interstimulus intervals seem to lock the percept in its present state and the subsequent ambiguous test stimulus will be perceived in the identical configuration. Further analysis will reveal if different adaptation and priming mechanisms are active for convex and concave images, given the inherent tuning of the visual system to convexity. The investigation of these history effects will help us to identify the relative contribution of stimulus-driven and cognitive factors to the perception of ambiguous 3D shapes.