de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Differential patterns of multisensory interactions in core and belt areas of human auditory cortex

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84187

Herdener M, Esposito F, Hubl D, di Salle F, Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Lehmann, C., Herdener M, Esposito F, Hubl D, di Salle F, Scheffler, K., Bach DR, Federspiel A, Kretz R, Dierks, T., & Seifritz, E. (2006). Differential patterns of multisensory interactions in core and belt areas of human auditory cortex. NeuroImage, 31(1), 294-300. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.12.038.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D1C7-F
Abstract
The auditory cortex is anatomically segregated into a central core and a peripheral belt region, which exhibit differences in preference to bandpassed noise and in temporal patterns of response to acoustic stimuli. While it has been shown that visual stimuli can modify response magnitude in auditory cortex, little is known about differential patterns of multisensory interactions in core and belt. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined the influence of a short visual stimulus presented prior to acoustic stimulation on the spatial pattern of blood oxygen level-dependent signal response in auditory cortex. Consistent with crossmodal inhibition, the light produced a suppression of signal response in a cortical region corresponding to the core. In the surrounding areas corresponding to the belt regions, however, we found an inverse modulation with an increasing signal in centrifugal direction. Our data suggest that crossmodal effects are differentially modulated according to the hierarchical core-belt organization of auditory cortex.