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Vortrag

Visually induced linear vection is enhanced by small physical accelerations

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84170

Riecke,  BE
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83846

Caniard,  F
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84199

Schulte-Pelkum,  J
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Riecke, B., Caniard, F., & Schulte-Pelkum, J. (2006). Visually induced linear vection is enhanced by small physical accelerations. Talk presented at 7th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2006). Dublin, Ireland.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D1B5-8
Zusammenfassung
Wong amp; Frost (1981) showed that the onset latency of visually induced self-rotation illusions (circular vection) can be reduced by concomitant small physical motions (jerks). Here, we tested whether (a) such facilitation also applies for translations, and (b) whether the strength of the jerk (degree of visuo-vestibular cue conflict) matters. 14 naïve observers rated onset, intensity, and convincingness of forward linear vection induced by photorealistic visual stimuli of a street of houses presented on a projection screen (FOV: 75°×58°). For 2/3 of the trials, brief physical forward accelerations (jerks applied using a Stewart motion platform) accompanied the visual motion onset. Adding jerks enhanced vection significantly; Onset latency was reduced by 50, convincingness and intensity ratings increased by more than 60. Effect size was independent of visual acceleration (1.2 and 12m/s^2) and jerk size (about 0.8 and 1.6m/s^2 at participants’ head for 1 and 3cm displacement, respectively), and showed no interactions. Thus, quantitative matching between the visual and physical acceleration profiles might not be as critical as often believed as long as they match qualitatively and are temporally synchronized. These findings could be employed for improving the convincingness and effectiveness of low-cost simulators without the need for expensive, large motion platforms.