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A general deficit of the ‘automatic pilot’ with posterior parietal cortex lesions?

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84990

Karnath H-O, Franz,  VH
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84238

Stockmeier,  K
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Himmelbach, M., Karnath H-O, Franz, V., Stockmeier, K., & Perenin, M.-T. (2006). A general deficit of the ‘automatic pilot’ with posterior parietal cortex lesions? Neuropsychologia, 44(13), 2749-2756. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.04.030.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D113-5
Zusammenfassung
Lesions of the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) in humans cause gross deviations of reaching movements and impaired grip formation if the targets are located in the subjects’ peripheral visual field. Movements to central targets are typically less impaired. This disorder has been termed “optic ataxia”. It has been suggested that a general deficit of online corrections under central as well as peripheral viewing conditions might be sufficient to explain this discrepancy. According to this hypothesis, patients with optic ataxia should demonstrate an impaired online correction of grip aperture under central viewing conditions if the target object changes its size during the grasping movement. We investigated this prediction in a patient with optic ataxia (I.G.) in a virtual visuo-haptic grasping task. We imposed an isolated need for online corrections of the hand aperture independently of positional changes of the target object. While we found some general inaccuracies of her grasping movements, the patient d id not show a specific impairment of online adjustment of grip aperture. On the contrary, I.G. smoothly adjusted her grip aperture comparable to healthy subjects. A general deficit of fast movement correction affecting targets in peripheral as well as central visual fields thus does not appear to account for the overt visuomotor deficits in optic ataxia. Rather, it seems more likely that an anatomical dissociation between visuomotor pathways related to actions in the central and in the peripheral visual field underlies the dissociation of visuomotor performance depending on the retinotopic target position in optic ataxia.