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Conference Paper

The Evaluation of Stylized Facial Expressions

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83870

Fischer J, Cunningham,  DW
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wallraven, C., Fischer J, Cunningham, D., Bartz, D., & Bülthoff, H. (2006). The Evaluation of Stylized Facial Expressions. In 3rd Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (APGV 2006) (pp. 85-92). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D0F9-7
Abstract
Stylized rendering aims to abstract information in an image making it useful not only for artistic but also for visualization purposes. Recent advances in computer graphics techniques have made it possible to render many varieties of stylized imagery efficiently. So far, however, few attempts have been made to characterize the perceptual impact and effectiveness of stylization. In this paper, we report several experiments that evaluate three different stylization techniques in the context of dynamic facial expressions. Going beyond the usual questionnaire approach, the experiments compare the techniques according to several criteria ranging from introspective measures (subjective preference) to task-dependent measures (recognizability, intensity). Our results shed light on how stylization of image contents affects the perception and subjective evaluation of facial expressions.