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Motion from the bottom up: From detection to cognition

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84291

Vuong,  QC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84141

Pilz,  KS
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Vuong, Q., Pilz, K., & Chuang, L. (2006). Motion from the bottom up: From detection to cognition. Talk presented at 29th European Conference on Visual Perception. St. Petersburg, Russia.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D0C5-C
Abstract
Motion signals projected onto the retina serve many different yet essential behavioral functions: from quickly detecting objects and segmenting them from background clutter, to effectively navigating through a dynamic environment and recognizing and interacting with objects populating that environment. Not surprisingly, computer scientists, psychologists, cognitive scientists, and neuroscientists alike have actively studied the perception and processing of visual motion. Until recently, the general approach has been to investigate mechanisms of motion perception relevant for specific purposes and typically focused at a specific level of processing, such as stimulus- or cognitively-driven mechanisms. Although this approach has greatly extended our knowledge and appreciation of visual motion processing, it is less clear how motion information relates across these different levels. The purpose of this symposium is to bridge the gap between these levels of visual motion processing and foster discussion between re searchers across the various levels.