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Poster

Perceptual similarity between grey levels depends on learnt sensorimotor correlation between grey levels and eye movements

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83819

Bompas,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83906

Ernst,  MO
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Bompas, A., & Ernst, M. (2006). Perceptual similarity between grey levels depends on learnt sensorimotor correlation between grey levels and eye movements. Poster presented at 29th European Conference on Visual Perception, St. Petersburg.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D0AF-F
Zusammenfassung
We propose that perceived similarity between two grey levels is related to the way they have been previously associated through eye saccades, actually reflecting their probability of co-occurrence in space and time. In the present study, we modified relative perceptual distances between grey levels by artificially associating certain pairs of grey levels with small eye saccades and other pairs with large eye saccades. In the test stage, we varied the luminance of a test patch (5 levels from 15 to 21 cd m-2) to determine the luminance perceived as 'right-in-between' that of two reference stimuli, dark and light (10 and 26 cd m-2). Each trial involved simultaneous presentation of one test grey and the two reference greys. The subject's task was to indicate whether the test patch looked more similar to the light or dark reference grey. Adaptation trials involved successive presentation of one of each test greys centred on the screen followed by the dark stimulus with a 10° eccentricity or the light stimulus with a 20° eccentricity, with equal probability. A control condition was employed without eccentricity difference. Only in the main condition does the post-test show an increased relative similarity between the test greys and the dark patch.