de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Poster

Familiar form and motion influence perceptual dominance

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84291

Vuong,  QC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84258

Thornton,  IM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Chuang, L., Vuong, Q., Thornton, I., & Bülthoff, H. (2006). Familiar form and motion influence perceptual dominance. Poster presented at 29th European Conference on Visual Perception, St. Petersburg.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D0A9-C
Zusammenfassung
Binocular rivalry can occur when two different stimuli are presented separately to each eye. Typically, the dominant percept alternates between the two presented stimuli. Prior studies have shown that perceptual dominance can be induced by low-level factors such as luminance as well as high-level factors such as object categories, suggesting that rivalry reflects competition at multiple levels of visual processing. Here, we investigated whether learned shape and motion of rigidly rotating objects can bias perceptual dominance during binocular rivalry. Observers first learned four novel objects that each rotated in a specific direction. These objects were randomly created by free-form deformation techniques. Following learning, we induced binocular rivalry between a learned object and a novel distractor. The learned object could rotate in its learned or reversed direction. For comparison purposes, we also included pairs of only novel objects. Initial results show that learned objects rotating in their learned direction are perceptually dominant more often than the paired distractors. Learned objects rotating in reverse do not appear to differ from novel objects in terms of perceived dominance. These findings suggest that binocular rivalry could provide a useful implicit measure of the roles played by shape and motion during object recognition.