de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Buchkapitel

Processing of identity and emotion in faces: a psychophysical, physiological and computational perspective

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84420

Schwaninger,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83870

Cunningham,  DW
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Schwaninger, A., Wallraven, C., Cunningham, D., & Chiller-Glaus, S. (2006). Processing of identity and emotion in faces: a psychophysical, physiological and computational perspective. In Understanding emotions (pp. 321-343). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D05D-9
Zusammenfassung
A deeper understanding of how the brain processes visual information can be obtained by comparing results from complementary fields such as psychophysics, physiology and computer science. In this article, empirical findings are reviewed with regard to the proposed mechanisms and representations for processing identity and emotion in faces. Results from psychophysics clearly show that faces are processed by analyzing component information (eyes, nose, mouth, etc.) and their spatial relationship (configural information). Results from neuroscience indicate separate neural systems for recognition of identity and facial expression. Computer science offers a deeper understanding of the required algorithms and representations, and provides computational modeling of psychological and physiological accounts. An interdisciplinary approach taking these different perspectives into account provides a promising basis for better understanding and modeling how the human brain processes visual information for recognition of i dentity and emotion in faces.