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A method for generating a “purely first-order” dichoptic motion stimulus

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83957

Hayashi,  R
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84260

Nishida S, Tolias,  A
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Hayashi, R., Nishida S, Tolias, A., & Logothetis, N. (2007). A method for generating a “purely first-order” dichoptic motion stimulus. Journal of Vision, 7(8:7), 1-10. doi:10.1167/7.8.7.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CD49-8
Abstract
In the present technical article, we describe a method for generating a new dichoptic motion stimulus, the monocular components of which are dynamic random noise without constant figural cues for feature-tracking-based motion. Our dichoptic motion stimulus adds a new line of evidence, which supports the original conclusion of M. Shadlen and T. Carney (1986) that motion detection can be solely derived from early binocular motion processing. Further, we describe novel motion displays in which monocular motion and binocular motion are in opposite directions with variable intensity ratios. Our dichoptic stimuli will serve as a useful tool to investigate the interaction between low-level binocular motion detectors and monocular motion detectors without requiring feature extraction before motion detection.