de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Poster

Looking Down, Looking Up: Does Stature Influence Face Recognition?

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83840

Bülthoff,  I
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84320

Wolf,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84258

Thornton,  IM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Bülthoff, I., Wolf, T., & Thornton, I. (2007). Looking Down, Looking Up: Does Stature Influence Face Recognition?. Poster presented at 10th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2007), Tübingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CCEF-D
Zusammenfassung
In the German population, men are on average 13 cm taller than women [1]. Smaller people, many of them women, look at other faces from below (viewing angle) while tall people look at others from above. The minimal distance between 2 persons not engaged in mutual gaze is around 50 cm [2]. Thus, with regard to male and female average statures, in close-up situations, the average viewing angle between males and females is around 13 deg. Do people have therefore different “preferred” representations of faces depending on their stature? More specifically, are tall and small people more efficient at processing face seen “from above” and from “below” respectively? Furthermore, do observers have different “preferred” representations of male and female faces because men are on average taller than women? To investigate the influence of stature and sex on face recognition, we first investigated whether efficiency in a sex classification task might be influenced by face orientation. To maximize stature differences between participants, we tested two groups: small women (under 165cm) and tall men (over 180cm). If face representation is influenced by stature, we expect small women to be more efficient (faster) at processing faces viewed as seen from below and vice-versa for tall men. Furthermore, because of natural average stature differences between men and women, efficient categorization of male and female faces might depend on their orientation. We used unfamiliar male and female faces shown at pitch angles between -18 deg (looking downward) to +18 deg (looking upward). We tested participants in a speeded sex classification task. Male and female participants saw 220 faces one by one and had to classify them as male or female as fast as possible. Classification accuracy was high (over 95). Analysis of reaction times does not show any relation between stature of observer, sex of shown face and its pitch orientation, thus suggesting that face processing with regards to sex is not influenced predominantly by stature of observer or sex of presented face.