de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Konferenzbeitrag

Perception and prediction of simple object interactions

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84115

Nusseck,  M
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83913

Lagarde J, Bardy B, Fleming,  R
Research Group Computational Vision and Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Nusseck, M., Lagarde J, Bardy B, Fleming, R., & Bülthoff, H. (2007). Perception and prediction of simple object interactions. In 4th Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (APGV 2007) (pp. 27-34). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CCC3-B
Zusammenfassung
For humans, it is useful to be able to visually detect an object's physical properties. One potentially important source of information is the way the object moves and interacts with other objects in the environment. Here, we use computer simulations of a virtual ball bouncing on a horizontal plane to study the correspondence between our ability to estimate the ball's elasticity and to predict its future path. Three experiments were conducted to address (1) perception of the ball's elasticity, (2) interaction with the ball, and (3) prediction of its trajectory. The results suggest that different strategies and information sources are used for passive perception versus actively predicting future behavior.