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The effect of context in face and object recognition

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83840

Bülthoff,  I
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84291

Vuong,  QC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bülthoff, I., & Vuong, Q. (2007). The effect of context in face and object recognition. Poster presented at 30th European Conference on Visual Perception, Arezzo, Italy.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CC73-0
Abstract
Whether recognition and categorization are parallel or serial processes remains controversial. To address this, we investigated whether face recognition is influenced by task-irrelevant face categ- ories. We examined the recognition of a target face presented in the context of other faces of the same or different racial category using a same ^ different matching task. Caucasian partici- pants were presented during learning with a set of six faces displaying one target face among different numbers of same-race faces. Participants recognized Caucasian targets better when five same-race faces rather than a single same-race face were present in the set, while this effect was absent for Asian targets. Surprisingly, participants recognized Asian targets better in sets with equal numbers of Asian and Caucasian context faces. Similar experiments, but with novel objects, were conducted in which categories were defined by similarity or expertise. These factors did not fully account for the context effects observed with faces. Overall, the results suggest that face recognition and categorization interact but other factors such as task difficulty may also affect face recognition.