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Poster

On the spatial scale of the local field potential - orientation and ocularity tuning of the local field potential in the primary visual cortex of the macaque

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83801

Berens,  P
Research Group Computational Vision and Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83896

Ecker,  AS
Research Group Computational Vision and Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84007

Keliris,  GA
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84260

Tolias,  AS
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Berens, P., Ecker, A., Keliris, G., Logothetis, N., & Tolias, A. (2007). On the spatial scale of the local field potential - orientation and ocularity tuning of the local field potential in the primary visual cortex of the macaque. Poster presented at 37th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2007), San Diego, CA, USA.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CB3D-5
Zusammenfassung
The local field potential (LFP) and, in particular, the gamma-band frequency range (30-90 Hz) have recently received much attention, as numerous studies have shown correlations between LFP and sensory, motor and cognitive variables in various cortical regions. However, the extent to which it reflects the activity of local populations of neurons remains elusive. The issue of spatial scale is central for understanding the origins of the LFP and how this signal can be used to study the functional organization of the brain. We addressed this question by simultaneously recording multi-unit spiking activity (MUA) and LFP from the primary visual cortex (V1) of awake, behaving macaques using arrays of tetrodes. Oriented gratings were used for visual stimulation, applied either binocular or monocular. The columnar organization of stimulus orientation and ocularity in V1 provides an excellent opportunity to study the spatial precision of the LFP signal, because neurons with similar orientation preference are organized at the fine spatial scale of cortical microcolumns (50-100 μm), whereas ocular dominance columns span around 450 μm. As shown before, we find that the increase of LFP gamma-band power is a function of orientation and ocularity of the stimulus. However, the power of the gamma-band contains much less information about the orientation of the stimulus than the MUA recorded at the same site. The average discriminability d' between preferred and orthogonal orientation was 2.46±0.15 for MUA and 1.01±0.05 for LFP (mean ±std). Moreover, we find only a weak correlation between the preferred orientation of the MUA tuning function and that of the LFP (r=0.21, p<0.05). In contrast, we find a strong correlation between the preferred ocularity of the two signals (r=0.53, p<1e-9). We therefore conclude that the gamma-power of the LFP does not reflect well the local activity on the scale of orientation columns but does capture the ocular dominance structure of V1. We suggest that gamma-band activity is generated by ensembles of neurons larger than 50-100 μm. In agreement with a previous study (Liu Newsome, 2006) we find that it more likely resembles the activity of neurons from an area spanning a few hundred micrometers.