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Poster

Face scanning strategies in monkeys (Macaca mulatta): an eye movement investigation

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83873

Dahl,  CD
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Dahl, C., Wallraven, C., Bülthoff, H., & Logothetis, N. (2007). Face scanning strategies in monkeys (Macaca mulatta): an eye movement investigation. Poster presented at 48th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, CA, USA.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CB2B-D
Zusammenfassung
It has been demonstrated that monkeys process conspecific faces holistically—unlike human or marmoset monkey faces (Dahl et al., Proc.R.Soc.B, accepted). Face inversion or blurring systematically affected the proportion of fixation and viewing time. Here, we describe the scanning characteristics on monkey and human faces using a nonreinforced paradigm. Upright and blurred monkey faces elicited initial fixations and refixations of eyes, before transferring to lower facial parts. For human faces, an initial fixation in the upper face regions was followed by an unspecific saccade to other regions. Inversion elicited an initial fixation on the upper quadrants of monkey faces, followed by fixations across the whole face. Inverted human faces, however, differed relatively little from upright human faces. Depending on the presentation condition of a face, the same face can trigger a different scanning behavior, which in turn is specific to the species affiliation, indicating a high-level influence.