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Konferenzbeitrag

Visualization and (Mis)Perceptions in Virtual Reality

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84378

Campos,  JL
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84114

Nusseck,  H-G
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84088

Mohler,  BJ
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Campos, J., Nusseck, H.-G., Wallraven, C., Mohler, B., & Bülthoff, H. (2007). Visualization and (Mis)Perceptions in Virtual Reality. In 10. Workshop Sichtsysteme: Visualisierung in der Simulationstechnik (pp. 10-14). Aachen, Germany: Shaker.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CB1F-9
Zusammenfassung
Virtual Reality (VR) technologies are now being widely adopted for use in areas as diverse as surgical and military training, architectural design, driving and flight simulation, psychotherapy, and gaming/entertainment. A large range of visual displays (from desktop monitors and head-mounted displays (HMDs) to large projection systems) are all currently being employed where each display technology offers unique advantages as well as disadvantages. In addition to technical considerations involved in choosing a VR interface, it is also critical to consider perceptual and psychophysical factors concerned with visual displays. It is now widely recognized that perceptual judgments of particular spatial properties are different in VR than in the real world. In this paper, we will provide a brief overview of what is currently known about the kinds of perceptual errors that can be observed in virtual environments (VEs). Subsequently we will outline the advantages and disadvantages of particular visual displays by foc using on the perceptual and behavioral constraints that are relevant for each. Overall, the main objective of this paper is to highlight the importance of understanding perceptual issues when evaluating different types of visual simulation in VEs.