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Conference Paper

Human Interaction in Multi-User Virtual Reality

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84240

Streuber,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83857

Chatziastros,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Streuber, S., & Chatziastros, A. (2007). Human Interaction in Multi-User Virtual Reality. In 10th International Conference on Humans and Computers (HC 2007) (pp. 1-6). Aizu, Japan: University of Aizu.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CAF3-F
Abstract
In this paper we will present an immersive multi- user environment for studying joint action and so- cial interaction. Besides the technical challenges of immersing multiple persons into a single virtual environment, additional research questions arise: Which parameters are coordinated during a joint action transportation task? In what way does the visual absence of the interaction partner affect the coordination task? What role does haptic feed- back play in a transportation task? To answer these questions and to test the new experimental environment we instructed pairs of subjects to per- form a classical joint action transportation task: carrying a stretcher through an obstacle course. With this behavioral experiment we demonstrated that joint action behavior (resulting from the co- ordination task) is a stable process. Even though visual and haptic information about the interac- tion partner were reduced, humans quickly com- pensated for the lack of information. After a short time they did not perform significantly differently from normal joint action behavior.