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Influence of the field of view on speed estimation during visual translations

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84148

Pretto,  P
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83831

Bresciani,  J-P
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84281

Vidal,  M
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pretto, P., Bresciani, J.-P., Vidal, M., & Bülthoff, H. (2008). Influence of the field of view on speed estimation during visual translations. Poster presented at 31st European Conference on Visual Perception, Utrecht, Netherlands.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C7E9-1
Abstract
During translations along the antero-posterior axis, the angular velocity of the visual flow on the retina varies with the retinal eccentricity of the stimulus. We tested how the perceived translation speed is affected by the portion of the retina that is stimulated. Twelve seated subjects were presented with visual translations at constant speed through a volume of random dots. The perceived speed was compared between different field-of-view (FOV) conditions, masks of different sizes being used to occlude either central or peripheral areas of the FOV (230*125 degrees when non-occluded). With central FOVs smaller than 40 degrees (ie, peripheral vision occluded), the visual speed was systematically underestimated, the bias being inversely proportional to the size of the FOV. In contrast, when the central region was occluded and visual flow only presented peripherally, the speed was systematically overestimated. This overestimation was observed even when only 10 degrees of central FOV were occluded. Our results suggest that correct perception of visual speed requires at least 40 degrees of central FOV.