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Background dopamine concentration dependently facilitates long-term potentiation in rat prefrontal cortex through postsynaptic activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases.

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84077

Marzo,  A
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kolomiets, B., Marzo, A., Caboche J, Vanhoutte, P., & Otani, S. (2009). Background dopamine concentration dependently facilitates long-term potentiation in rat prefrontal cortex through postsynaptic activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Cerebral Cortex, 19(11), 2708-2718. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhp047.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C583-8
Abstract
Altered levels of tonic/background dopamine in prefrontal cortex (PFC) may underlie modifications of executive cognitive function. We showed previously in rat PFC slices that exogenously supplied background dopamine facilitates induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), a possible cellular substrate for the long-term component of executive cognitive function. In the present study, we characterized cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this modulatory dopamine effect. We show first that the LTP-facilitating effect of tonic/background dopamine follows an inverted-U shape concentration curve and that the effective level of background dopamine slowly activates postsynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) to facilitate LTP. Furthermore, we show the evidence that LTP-inducing high-frequency stimulation evokes endogenous release of dopamine in PFC slices. This fast dopamine serves as a trigger for LTP in the presence of the background dopamine. In its absence, the endogenous dopamine triggered, instead, long-term depression. These results indicate that appropriate levels of tonic/background dopamine serve to activate critical molecular factors in PFC neurons and thereby facilitate induction of synaptic potentiation.