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Does Brief Exposure to a Self-avatar Affect Common Human Behaviors in Immersive Virtual Environments?

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84240

Streuber,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83877

de la Rosa,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84730

Trutoiu,  LC
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84088

Mohler,  B
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Streuber, S., de la Rosa, S., Trutoiu, L., Bülthoff, H., & Mohler, B. (2009). Does Brief Exposure to a Self-avatar Affect Common Human Behaviors in Immersive Virtual Environments? Eurographics 2009: The 30th Annual Conference of the European Association for Computer Graphics, 33-36.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C543-7
Zusammenfassung
A plausible assumption is that self-avatars increase the realism of immersive virtual environments (VEs), because self-avatars provide the user with a visual representation of his/her own body. Consequently having a self-avatar might lead to more realistic human behavior in VEs. To test this hypothesis we compared human behavior in VE with and without providing knowledge about a self-avatar with real human behavior in real-space. This comparison was made for three tasks: a locomotion task (moving through the content of the VE), an object interaction task (interacting with the content of the VE), and a social interaction task (interacting with other social entities within the VE). Surprisingly, we did not find effects of a self-avatar exposure on any of these tasks. However, participant’s VE and real world behavior differed significantly. These results challenge the claim that knowledge about the self-avatar substantially influences natural human behavior in immersive VEs.