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Treating Tinnitus with TMS: Theta burst stimulation and the relive of auditory phantom perceptions

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83933

Giani,  AS
Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Giani, A., Hamisch W, Hagen R, Varallay CG, Solymosi L, Polak T, Plichta M, Sack, A., & Fallgatter, A. (2009). Treating Tinnitus with TMS: Theta burst stimulation and the relive of auditory phantom perceptions. Talk presented at 3rd Tinnitus Research Initiative Meeting (TRI 2009): From Clinical Practice to Basic Neuroscience and back. Stresa, Italy.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C4BB-3
Abstract
Objective: People suffering from chronic tinnitus continuously experience auditory noise in the absence of any auditory stimulation. This phantom perception has been related to an enhanced activation of the auditory cortex. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) represents a convenient tool that effectively inhibits this hyperactivity. Hence, TBS might release patients from their distressing auditory perceptions. Methods: In a placebo controlled design the effect of two weeks of TBS on chronic tinnitus was evaluated for 12 tinnitus patients. During each session two trains of each 200 theta bursts (one burst = 3 pulses, 50Hz) were applied, resulting in a total of 1200 pulses. By means of a neuronavigation device the TMS coil could be located exactly above the auditory cortex. For evaluation of the cortical activation we depicted the hemodynamic response using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Lastly, the excitability of the motor cortex was assessed using a double pulse TMS paradigm. Results: Preliminary results reveal that TBS can effectively improve tinnitus severity. In some patients the score on the tinnitus questionnaire and on the tinnitus handicap inventory declined by maximally 50. Discussion: The effectiveness of TBS will be evaluated. Moreover the effect of TBS on the hemodynamic (NIRS) response and on cortical excitability (double pulse TMS) will be discussed and related to changes in tinnitus severity.