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Conference Paper

Influence of visual and haptic delays on stiffness perception in augmented reality

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83885

Di Luca,  M
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Knörlein, B., Di Luca, M., & Harders, M. (2009). Influence of visual and haptic delays on stiffness perception in augmented reality. In 8th IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR 2009) (pp. 49-52). Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE Service Center.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C282-4
Abstract
Visual delays are unavoidable in augmented reality setups and occur in different steps of the rendering pipeline. In the context of haptic interaction with virtual objects, it has been shown that delayed force feedback can alter the perception of object stiffness. We hypothesize that delays in augmented reality systems can have similar consequences. To test this, we carried out a user study to investigate the effect of visual and haptic delays on the perception of stiffness. The experiment has been performed in an optimized visuo-haptic augmented reality setup, which allows to artificially manipulate delays during visual and haptic rendering. In line with previous results, delays for haptic feedback resulted in decreased perceived stiffness. In contrast, visual delays caused an increase in perceived stiffness. However, the simultaneous occurrence of delays in both sensory channels led to a partial compensation of these effects. This could potentially help to correct stiffness perception of virtual objects in visuo-haptic augmented reality systems.