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Visual and Haptic Perceptual Spaces From Parametrically-Defined to Natural Objects

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83925

Gaissert,  N
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84268

Ulrichs,  K
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gaissert, N., Ulrichs, K., & Wallraven, C. (2010). Visual and Haptic Perceptual Spaces From Parametrically-Defined to Natural Objects. In AAAI 2010 Spring Symposium on Cognitive Shape Processing (pp. 2-7). Menlo Park, CA, USA: AAAI Press.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C108-D
Abstract
In this study we show that humans form very similar perceptual spaces when they explore parametrically-defined shell-shaped objects visually or haptically. A physical object space was generated by varying three shape parameters. Sighted participants explored pictures of these objects while blindfolded participants haptically explored 3D printouts of the objects. Similarity ratings were performed and analyzed using multidimensional scaling (MDS) techniques. Visual and haptic similarity ratings highly correlate and resulted in very similar visual and haptic MDS maps providing evidence for one shared perceptual space underlying both modalities. To investigate to which degree these results are transferrable to natural objects, we performed the same visual and haptic similarity ratings and multidimensional scaling analyses using a set of natural sea shells.