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Eye and Pointer Coordination in Search and Selection Tasks

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83811

Bieg,  H-J
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  LL
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83913

Fleming,  RW
Research Group Computational Vision and Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Bieg, H.-J., Chuang, L., Fleming, R., Reiterer, H., & Bülthoff, H. (2010). Eye and Pointer Coordination in Search and Selection Tasks. In Symposium on Eye Tracking Research and Applications (ETRA 2010) (pp. 89-92). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C106-2
Zusammenfassung
Selecting a graphical item by pointing with a computer mouse is a ubiquitous task in many graphical user interfaces. Several techniques have been suggested to facilitate this task, for instance, by reducing the required movement distance. Here we measure the natural coordination of eye and mouse pointer control across several search and selection tasks. We find that users automatically minimize the distance to likely targets in an intelligent, task dependent way. When target location is highly predictable, top-down knowledge can enable users to initiate pointer movements prior to target fixation. These findings ques-tion the utility of existing assistive pointing techniques and suggest that alternative approaches might be more effective.