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Sensory neural codes using multiplexed temporal scales

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84966

Panzeri,  S
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Brunel N, Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84006

Kayser,  C
Research Group Physiology of Sensory Integration, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Physiology of Sensory Integration, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Panzeri, S., Brunel N, Logothetis, N., & Kayser, C. (2010). Sensory neural codes using multiplexed temporal scales. Trends in Neurosciences, 33(3), 111-120. doi:10.1016/j.tins.2009.12.001.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C0FC-2
Abstract
Determining how neuronal activity represents sensory information is central for understanding perception. Recent work shows that neural responses at different timescales can encode different stimulus attributes, resulting in a temporal multiplexing of sensory information. Multiplexing increases the encoding capacity of neural responses, enables disambiguation of stimuli that cannot be discriminated at a single response timescale, and makes sensory representations stable to the presence of variability in the sensory world. Thus, as we discuss here, temporal multiplexing could be a key strategy used by the brain to form an information-rich and stable representation of the environment.