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Multitask Learning for Brain-Computer Interfaces

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83779

Alamgir,  M
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83948

Grosse-Wentrup,  M
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83782

Altun,  Y
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Alamgir, M., Grosse-Wentrup, M., & Altun, Y. (2010). Multitask Learning for Brain-Computer Interfaces. Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS 2010), 17-24.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C048-5
Zusammenfassung
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are limited in their applicability in everyday settings by the current necessity to record subjectspecific calibration data prior to actual use of the BCI for communication. In this paper, we utilize the framework of multitask learning to construct a BCI that can be used without any subject-specific calibration process. We discuss how this out-of-the-box BCI can be further improved in a computationally efficient manner as subject-specific data becomes available. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated on two sets of experimental EEG data recorded during a standard two-class motor imagery paradigm from a total of 19 healthy subjects. Specifically, we show that satisfactory classification results can be achieved with zero training data, and combining prior recordings with subjectspecific calibration data substantially outperforms using subject-specific data only. Our results further show that transfer between recordings under slightly different experimental setups is feasible.