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Multiple criteria for multisensory signals

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84129

Parise,  CV
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83885

Di Luca,  M
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83906

Ernst,  MO
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Parise, C., Di Luca, M., & Ernst, M. (2010). Multiple criteria for multisensory signals. Poster presented at 11th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2010), Liverpool, UK.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BFD6-C
Abstract
Perceptual judgments are classically regarded as involving both a sensory and a decisional component. An optimal observer engaged in a signal detection task should maximize the correct responses by setting an appropriate decisional criterion according to his/her sensitivity to sensory signals. A large body of literature supports the view that observers set a near-optimal criterion in the detection of a single signal. However, there seems to be a systematic deviation from optimality when observers are required to concurrently judge multiple signals within the visual modality. In this case, observers set only a single criterion for the joint presentation of the compound signals (Gorea Sagi 2000). This result has been interpreted as an indication that humans are unable to simultaneously handle multiple signal representations within a sensory modality. Literature, however, remains silent as to the crossmodal case. In a 2IFC task we asked participants to concurrently report whether or not visual and/or auditory stimuli changed position within each trial. Our results show that with multisensory signals observers can simultaneously set separate criteria for each modality. It is still an open question whether separate criteria are also set when multisensory signals are integrated.