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Nonbalanced SSFP-based quantitative magnetization transfer imaging

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84187

Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Gloor, M., Scheffler, K., & Bieri, O. (2010). Nonbalanced SSFP-based quantitative magnetization transfer imaging. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 64(1), 149-156. doi:10.1002/mrm.22331.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BF26-7
Zusammenfassung
The previously reported concept for quantitative magnetization transfer (MT) imaging using balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) is applied to nonbalanced SSFP sequences. This offers the possibility to derive quantitative MT parameters of targets with high-susceptibility variations such as the musculoskeletal system, where balanced SSFP suffers from off-resonance-related signal loss. In the first part of this work, an extended SSFP free induction decay (SSFP-FID) signal equation is derived based on a binary spin-bath model. Based on this new description, quantitative MT parameters such as the fractional pool size, magnetization exchange rate, and relaxation times can be assessed. In the second part of this work, MT model parameters are derived from an ex vivo muscle sample, in vivo human femoral muscle, and in vivo human patellar cartilage. Motion sensitivity issues are discussed and results from two-pool SSFP-FID are compared to results from two-pool balanced SSFP and common quantitative MT models. In summary, this work demonstrates that SSFP-FID allows for quantitative MT imaging of targets with high-susceptibility variations within short acquisition times.