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The effects of TMS over the parietal cortex on binocular rivalry

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84327

Zaretskaya,  N
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zaretskaya, N. (2010). The effects of TMS over the parietal cortex on binocular rivalry. Talk presented at 11th Conference of Junior Neuroscientists of Tübingen (NeNa 2010). Heiligkreuztal, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BE28-B
Abstract
Human fMRI studies of binocular rivalry and other bistable phenomena suggest that a network of frontal and parietal areas, predominantly in the right hemisphere, is particularly involved during switches between the two conflicting percepts. However, these studies do not provide information about causality, i.e. whether fMRI activity is a consequence or a cause of the perceptual change. In the current study we localized areas that were activated during perceptual switches in individual subjects using fMRI. We then tested the effect of disturbing neural processing in two distinct parietal regions along the ventral-dorsal axis in both hemispheres using 2 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Our results show that on the group level, TMS over the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) prolonged the periods of stable percepts. In individual subjects, the IPS in the hemisphere with higher fMRI activation also showed a stronger TMS effect, as reflected in the positive correlation between the lateralization of TMS effects and that of fMRI activations. Our results thus demonstrate a causal, de-stabilizing effect of the IPS on perceptual continuity and provide a direct link between correlational and causal measures of cortical function during conscious perception.