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Velocity-dependent curvature gain and avatar use for Redirected Walking

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84103

Neth,  CT
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84228

Souman,  JL
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83902

Engel,  D
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Kloos U, Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84088

Mohler,  BJ
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Neth, C., Souman, J., Engel, D., Kloos U, Bülthoff, H., & Mohler, B. (2010). Velocity-dependent curvature gain and avatar use for Redirected Walking. Poster presented at 2010 Joint Virtual Reality Conference of EuroVR - EGVE - VEC (JVRC 2010), Stuttgart, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BE0E-7
Abstract
We investigated in a study whether humans’ sensitivity to curved walking is affected by their walking velocity. Amongst other techniques, redirecting users of an immersive virtual environment on a curved path is part of the so-called ’Redirected Walking’. We conducted an experiment in which 12 participants walked specific curvatures at given speeds in a VR. We found that people are significantly less sensitive to walking on a curve when walking slower. Moreover, we assume the possibility of using avatars to support redirection algorithms as it was shown by Llobera et al. ([LSRS10]) that proxemics holds true for avatars in virtual environments, too. In this work, we depict three possible applications of how avatars could be used to achieve a better redirection.