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Conference Paper

Combining Real-Time Brain-Computer Interfacing and Robot Control for Stroke Rehabilitation

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons75510

Gomez Rodriguez,  M
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84135

Peters,  J
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Dept. Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83968

Hill,  J
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84193

Gharabaghi A, Schölkopf,  B
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83948

Grosse-Wentrup,  M
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gomez Rodriguez, M., Peters, J., Hill, J., Gharabaghi A, Schölkopf, B., & Grosse-Wentrup, M. (2010). Combining Real-Time Brain-Computer Interfacing and Robot Control for Stroke Rehabilitation. In Brain-Computer Interface Workshop at SIMPAR 2010: 2nd International Conference on Simulation, Modeling, and Programming for Autonomous Robots (pp. 59-63).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BD6A-0
Abstract
Brain-Computer Interfaces based on electrocorticography (ECoG) or electroencephalography (EEG), in combination with robot-assisted active physical therapy, may support traditional rehabilitation procedures for patients with severe motor impairment due to cerebrovascular brain damage caused by stroke. In this short report, we briefly review the state-of-the art in this exciting new field, give an overview of the work carried out at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics and the University of Tübingen, and discuss challenges that need to be addressed in order to move from basic research to clinical studies.