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How Are Lateral Chromatic Interactions Computed from Cone Signals?

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84306

Wehrhahn,  C
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84255

Teufel,  H
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Wehrhahn, C., & Teufel, H. (2010). How Are Lateral Chromatic Interactions Computed from Cone Signals? Neural Computation, 22(11), 2763-2784. doi:10.1162/NECO_a_00025.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BD62-F
Abstract
A small gray test field superimposed on a large colored background appears tinted in a color complementary to that of the surround. We tested the hypothesis whether photoreceptor sensitivity in the test field is altered in the presence of a colored surround. We investigated this effect using dichoptic viewing conditions. With the left eye, subjects viewed a small gray target superimposed on a large colored background. The right eye saw a gray target superimposed on a large gray background. When the two images were fused, observers perceived one homogeneous background and two targets. Observers matched the color of the target seen by the right eye to that seen by the left eye. A modified two-stage model for chromatic induction assuming that both receptor and postreceptor mechanisms contribute to the shift in color was fitted to the matched settings. We find that the dichoptic viewing effects presented here are well explained by an approximately equal contribution of receptor and postreceptor processes to the perceived shift in color.